(BIOLOGY) SPONGE CELLS: a fascinating yet understudied field. SpaceLab competition


Hello. My name is Jaime Costa.
I live in Tangier, Morocco. And this is my Space Lab
contest video. So my experiment
will be about sponges… …which are indeed
very interesting animals… …as they’ve got
the extraordinary capacity… …to reaggregate themselves. So if we cut a sponge… …and we disaggregate its cells… …by passing them through a sieve,
for instance… …what we will get is the dry cells. But if we put them back to water… …what we will get
is a brand-new sponge. So I think this experiment
could be done very easily… …in the International Space Station
with the OptiCell tool. The astronauts would only have to insert
the dry cells into water and see the result. So what results could we have… …and what questions could that answer
that can’t be answered on Earth? So first of all, what will be the shape? The shape is going to help us
understand the relationship… …between the cells themselves
in the moment of aggregation… …and also the spicules. So on Earth,
they are crushed one with each other… …but in space, as they have a particular form
(something like a methane molecule), we can deduce that it might be
a regular sponge… …or something more
geometrically shaped. The strength of the union
between the cells… …could be found with the experiment. And if there is no aggregation,
we can deduce… …that without gravity
that sticks for a moment… …one cell with each other,
there is no aggregation. If you get a lot of little sponges… …we can deduce that they can attach
one with each other. But the strength isn’t enough
to create a big one. And if we have only a big one… …we can think that the strength
of the union is very– Is great. And there is no problem. So thank you for watching my video
and I hope I see you soon.

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